Social Credit, could it be part of the answer?

So after a few months of studying Social Credit, I think I can summarise it thus;

It would be a financial system that is neither capitalist, nor communist. It would create interest free money, free of anything we would recognise as banks or private central bank cartels, and would be able to provide everyone with a ‘national dividend’.

The national dividend, would be the difference between all productivity and the wages, capital gains and dividends given out to share holders of companies across the economy. The chart bellow shows the gap between productivity and wages, showing that there is not enough money in the system to buy all the production available, meaning people go into usurious debt to purchase part of the remainder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So if we were to use a Social Credit like system, everyone would be credited an equal part of the difference, instead of having to go into debt. In the cases above, each American and Canadian, that is each man woman and child would get about $16,000 a year! That would be very handy when it comes to Christmas shopping, or getting a new car, or paying for a child’s education. This would mean that people could easily have as many children as they want, as a couple would make near to $30,000 a year, and $16,000 with each new child! Although, the dividend paid would depend on the year, the number of people working, as I imagine some people would not bother working and just like on the dividend, so it would fluctuate. Also this would mean the end of a welfare state, another very good by-product of the ‘national dividend’, as taxes would disappear, and with it government programmes, although this could happen over time.

I like the sound of that!

Next, the banks, which will be co-operatives, credit unions or publicly owned institutions, would lend to business and people as needed, but for only the return of the original capital, which is needed to keep the money supply stable, to preventing inflation. The loans would be for production, construction of houses, hospitals, schools and other needful things, roads, airports, seaports, bridges etc…without any local or national government having to go into the debt spiral, where they end up having to roll over debt just to keep afloat. Under a Social Credit system, most governments would not get into ridiculous debt, and if they did, they would not have the interest to pay, only the capital.

Another part of the Social Credit system which Clifford Hugh Douglas explained, is that we would not need political parties, now this is something I like, although I don’t think it is necessarily true, he tells us that parties are divisive, and he also opposed ‘democracy’, as I do, just read the next paragraph;

‘Now “the people” is a collective term which, in order to make its nature clearer, may be translated as “the mob”. I am not substituting what may appear to be a derogatory word for one which appears to be more respectable, with a view to expressing contempt for the population considered collectively, but because a good deal of attention has been devoted to the psychology of mobs, and the conclusions, where they are sound, are obviously applicable to democracy. The outstanding feature of a mob is that it does not reason, or certainly does not reason effectively. Its conclusions as based upon reason can be stated, with confidence, to be almost invariably wrong. A mob feels, it does not think, and consequently by whatever mechanism we represent a mob we can represent only a desire, not a technique. It is, of course, possible to contend that the desires of a mob are always or frequently wrong. That is the blasphemy based on the theory of original sin, which is evident in the world today in various forms which can be largely included in the word “Puritanism. I do not believe in original sin. It is, however, quite certain that desire, emotion, or feeling, however you wish to phrase it, is plastic and possesses from its nature a strong desire to clothe itself in forms, so that if a mob shouts “We want food and shelter” it is easy to get it to translate that into a cry “We want work”, which is, of course, not at all the same thing. Now in this country we have evolved a mechanism of election which is alleged to be for the purpose of making the will of the mob evident. But the most cursory examination of the slogans on which elections are fought is sufficient to show that the machinery has been completely perverted.’

So, here we have a philosophy, which opposes, sensibly, and rationally the power of the bankers and the oligarchs who are behind them, it opposes party and strife, which is used to divide us, it opposes communism and the attempt to create an utopia here on earth, it is as Douglas explained, practical Christianity. Which is probably why it would never be tried, and if it was, why it would be opposed violently.

The legal and frenzied thievery which the whole modern edifice of government and finance is committing is astounding, the trillions that they have accumulated through no effort, on the backs of wage slaves, is criminal and immoral. The party politicians who are bought and paid for, who whore out their people for a small cut of the action are traitors and criminals who should be executed. The doped mobs of morons who are glued to ‘Big Brother’ and ‘Glee’ are oblivious of how their standard of livings are dropping, how it is getting harder and harder to live at an acceptable level, how they seem to never be able to buy or even rent a nice home and how their labour is being stolen from them by lazy, immoral and cruel TRILLIONAIRES!

Capitalism is Communism with some restraint, or at least the look of restraint, it is Communism done subtly, whilst Capitalism is a licence to loot until the people have nothing left and have been enslaved de jure as well as de facto. The system is bust, the time has come for something new.

A system with no usury, no interest and no fat Trillionaires living the high life for doing nothing! A system where ‘democracy’ and party is disempowered, where localities would be freer and thus all men!

Why not give Social Credit a go?

 

 

What is Social Credit?

Clifford Hugh Douglas and Social Credit    

In the immediate aftermath of the First World War (1914-18) Clifford Hugh Douglas was introduced to Orage. As an engineer working for major international companies, Douglas had observed that, in the case of any individual project, there was only ever one problem which could not be overcome, and that was lack of finance. If a project was considered desirable for a local community, it was always possible to find the tools, the machinery, the skills, the materials, the workers and all essential resources. But if the finance was not forthcoming, the project was invariably scrapped, or put on hold until the finance was available. In other words, policies were being determined by the availability of finance.

During the First World War, Douglas was in charge of sorting out the finances of Farnborough Aircraft Factory. He turned his engineering mind to the observation of the movement of finances through the productive enterprise, first at Farnborough and later in 100 different firms throughout the country. His observations held true. The rate of flow of

incomes, in terms of wages, salaries and dividends, did not match the rate of flow of prices of goods coming onto the market. Douglas followed his initial researches into the financial system with a study of the methods used by the Government to finance the unprecedented waste of the ‘War to End All Wars”. The technical details of his analysis of the capitalist financial system are fully explained in Douglas’ many books, speeches, pamphlets and articles, many of which are available elsewhere on this website.

For some months, Douglas and Orage held long discussions. Orage quickly recognised that Douglas held the answers to his concerns about the financing of production, whilst Douglas applied his purely financial theorising to the political philosophy of Guild Socialism. The result was a body of socio-economic theory which became known as ‘Social Credit’.

Good Work and the National Dividend

Like a great many people of his times, Douglas delighted in the potential of the Machine Age to open up the lives of ordinary people so that they could enjoy the benefits of the new technologies. However, he also foresaw the dangers of allowing economic growth to be driven by purely financial considerations. As things stood, the debt-financing of industry was leading to ever-increasing wasteful production of superfluous consumer items, and the ultimate destruction of resources in warfare. Instead of becoming free, people had made themselves slaves of the Machine, bound to work for a wage or salary as the primary means of obtaining an income. This is not a necessary state of affairs.

Adam Smith’s very early observations on the economics of the Machine Age make interesting reading. By coming together into a factory, dividing up the labour and using more sophisticated machinery, production can be increased geometrically, out of all proportion to the efforts of any single individual. To whom, therefore, should the benefit of the vast increase in output belong? Is it to the owner of the factory? To the individual workers in that factory? Or to families in the community as a whole who, after all, supply the workers to all factories and places of ‘work’ without financial charge? Social Credit literature raises many questions of this type, and provides far more satisfactory answers than can be found in conventional economics textbooks.

A central plank of Social Credit literature is the observation that no single individual can make any significant contribution to total wealth by their own efforts. No matter how talented or skilled they might be, or how much energy and time they put into their work, every individual relies upon complex networks of transport and farming systems and so on. In short, the Bill Gateses of this world could make nothing whatsoever without the massive development of tools and processes built up over untold generations. This ‘common cultural inheritance’ forms the source of all wealth in the Machine Age. It would therefore make sense for all members of the community to receive their birthright in the form of a ‘dividend’ payable, like any dividend on shares, independently of any income from employment. The case for and against the payment of a ‘National Dividend for all’ is well rehearsed in the Social Credit literature available on this website.

A Credit-driven Financial System

Douglas had no quarrel with banks or with machines. Operating efficiently and in harmony, the financial system and the new technologies had created the potential for a sane economic system, offering sufficiency for all. The new technologies, and sensible financial policies could be used to eliminate poverty and scarcity. However, as things stood during Douglas’ lifetime, finance-driven policy decisions were creating poverty amidst plenty, environmental degradation and war on an unprecedented scale. Finance and the new technologies would make excellent servants of humanity. But they were making very bad masters.

As things stand to this very day, finance dominates the lives of virtually every single person on the planet. From the moment of birth to the moment of death, the availability or lack of finance dictates what a person can and cannot do. Yet very few people can attempt to explain with any clarity exactly how it is that finance rules our lives. Clifford Hugh Douglas was one individual who, by observation and interpretation, came to a rigorous understanding of the financial system which had arisen during industrialisation.

Douglas observed, as a matter of fact and not mere opinion, that finance flows into the economic system as bank-created debt. Firms use the debt-created finance to pay their costs of production. The wages, salaries and dividends paid out by firms form incomes to households. With their incomes, households can purchase the stream of goods and services coming onto the market. As the modern economic system has developed, it has created a massive bureaucracy. Behind that bureaucracy, obscured by the very complexity of the system, financial speculation, profiteering, marketing, advertising and a whole range of growth-driven economic activities are making human existence increasingly precarious. In Douglas’ view, this is not a necessary state of human affairs. The system is there to be studied. Such study will reveal that, by using relatively straightforward accounting methodology, production, distribution and exchange – i.e., all economic activity – can be credit-driven rather than debt-driven.

Source

Upkeep

I have added a few new links, one’s I’ve had bookmarked for a while, there are a few everyone should read, the first is an interesting site called ‘The Modern Fascist’, it is a new blog and is apparently written by an 18-year-old American. I’m amazed that anyone is brave enough and smart enough to have the gall to call themselves a ‘fascist’, especially in America. Another very interesting read is ‘In This Age of Plenty’, a work by a Catholic Quebecer on the theory of Social Credit, I would be interested if anyone has an opinion on it, as I’m still working my way through the theory and trying to grasp how it could work.

Another interesting read is a book which I’ve entitled ‘White Australia Policy’ which is actually a long chapter from a book called ‘Connected Worlds’ written by an opponent of white self-rule, but he does do a good job of explaining the various experiments of white societies, trying to stay white in the face of a ‘rising tide of colour’, there are also chapters on South Africa, Rhodesia and the American South, which are just as interesting.

It is, I suppose a depressing read in some ways, to think of all the defeats and no victories we have had in the last century, but, it needs to be done!

If you have not yet had a peek at ‘The Fall of the Russian Empire’, it is also worth reading, the writer makes an interesting point that it was a spiritual failing in Russia that led to the conditions in which the Russian people stood by whilst their Emperor was deposed, imprisoned and then murdered, and that the Imperial family, were a symbol of the future that lay in store for the Russian people.

In the Art, Design and Architecture section, you may want to check out ‘Utopia’, people like Vanishing American would probably appreciate it, lots of beautiful old paintings and pictures of lost times. ‘Paris 1900’ is along a similar vein.

A blog I have enjoyed, despite not wanting to, is ‘Eternal Bachelor’, it is written by a fellow in London, from what I can surmise, he does not have much of a warm spot for women, and would not be what you would call a feminist! He uses some strong language, and I must actually admit it can sometimes be quite sad to see a man so jaded with feminism that he hates all women. But that is another of the curses of our times, our women turn on us as well as our enemies!

I also have an older link, ‘Magna Grece’, which is mainly concerned with Southern Italy before the Risorgimento which overthrew the ancient kingdoms of Naples and Sicily, it is written by a scholarly fellow and I have learned much from him, so please take a look.

Also, just for your edification, in the language section, there are a few good and free language sites, I have spent the summer brushing up on my French, German and Russian and it is actually very effective, especially with my French and German, I find Russian very difficult, and have only been studying it for the last two years, so it has not been as useful with that! So if you know a little French, German or another language, try it out, you can take it as fast or as slow as you wish, and it is definitely worth having another language.

Also, just for fun, I included ‘Thor Steinar’, a clothes company that apparently antifas don’t like because they accuse it of being a NAZI shop! It does seem that it was set up by a nationalist and that nationalists do shop there, but in reality it is not really that blatant, I just want a few people to buy some stuff to annoy the lefties!

Breaking the Bondage of Interest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Usury is the “Hidden Hand” in history. It is behind wars and revolutions, booms and busts, and the travesty termed “poverty amidst plenty.” It causes civil wars and class wars. Many problems of the world could be resolved with clarity once the dust the money-lenders throw in one’s eyes is removed. The financial system is the means by which power politics functions at all levels.

As one historical example of the “hidden hand” at work: How many Anglophobic Irishmen understand the real reasons for the “potato famine”? Henry Kelliher wrote that anecdotes were told to him of the harrowing starvation of the Irish. It was subsequently that he found the Irish famine was the result not of over-population, as claimed at that time among some quarters – nor even due to food shortages, since it was only the potato crop that failed. In 1845 (while the famine was to claim the lives of 1,029,000) 779,000 quarters of wheat and flour, 93,000 quarters of barley, and 2,353,000 quarters of oats – enough to feed for a year every person who died of starvation, nearly four times over – were exported from Ireland.[24] Kelliher commented:

When the true story of Ireland is written it will be found that all that stood between starvation and the available plenty, was the crushing interest burden that had to be paid to outside money-lenders, that the country was not suffering from famine, but from what we choose today to call “depression.” A famine is the absence of food caused by a lack of food; a depression is the absence of food caused by a lack of food, caused by a deficiency in the medium of exchange – money.[25]

How many are aware that a major cause of the French Revolution, the epochal event that was one of the first victories of Money Power over Tradition, was caused not by the masses yearning to overthrow the tyranny of Monarchy, but by the economic dislocations caused by debt, when 50% of state expenditure went to pay interest to money-lenders? And so we might continue, up to the present: how much of the aggravation between Islam and the West is caused (apart from the betrayal of the Arabs dating back to the Balfour Declaration and the Sykes-Picot Agreement) by the aim of international finance to control the Islamic world, where usury is regarded as “sin,” as it once was by Western Christendom? Remove the “Hidden Hand” of usury and once the perspective becomes clear, issues might be resolved with justice between many that are presently at each others’ throats while the real culprits remain invisible.

Source

I was aware that debt was instrumental in the downfall of the French Monarchy, I haven’t before thought about the influence of money power, interest, and usury in relation to the Irish Famine. If so, people like Gerry Adams, Martin McGuinness should be hating international finance, not the English. It seems to me that our main enemy is the banks. Almost every evil thing can be traced back to the shadowy group of obscenely wealthy men, who sit in vast palatial piles, served by swarms of servants, indulging in every perversity one can imagine, and they manage to do this by accruing money from everyone else in the world. Whether it is states that borrow and then dump the interest payments on the taxpayers, businesses who are encouraged to take massive loans to expand, or just average people who are encouraged to take out mortgages, credit cards and loans. All of these things increase the wealth of the money lenders, and increasingly leads us into deeper poverty.

It is now common knowledge that the Russian Revolution was due in large part, to external funding of various revolutionary parties. Large Wall Street and City of London bankers loaned money to the newly established Soviet state, and the banks continued to fund the Soviets throughout the Cold War, right up to the end. It amazes me how people didn’t see this, how the McCarthys who were trying to root out communism in America couldn’t see their own government lending vast amounts of money to the Soviets.

We know that Germany and Japan rejected the powerful bankers in the thirties and were destroyed. Perhaps their economic policies were only a small part of the reason for war, but I can’t imagine it played no part at all. It was these same banks who profited from the blood bath of the Great War, they made money from every war since, huge amounts of money, they have indebted almost every nation in the world, they have indebted many individuals as well. And when they make their obscene profits, they hoard the money, when they lose, as they did four years ago, they make us pay again! So we use money, much of it borrowed from the banks at interest, and we bail out those very same banks with the very same money, we lend it at no interest, and then have to figure out how to pay back the trillions we borrowed to bail the banks out, to the very same bailed out banks.

They issue their own bailout money and we have to pay interest on it! How crazy is that? How absurd!

The banks need to go.

I like the idea of Social Credit, it seems a way in which we could use money, without drowning in debt and usury, perhaps when the inevitable happens, when the economy completely implodes, perhaps something like Social Credit can be used to restore the ruins of our economy .